FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Feeling sad is a normal, short-term emotional state that is triggered by upsetting, hurtful or distressing experiences. Everyone will feel sad at some point and no one should be judged by expressing his or her sadness. Depression alternatively is an emotional disturbance that can affect our body, mind and overall outlook in life. Someone may feel a sense of hopelessness about the future, experience sleep disturbance, changes in appetite and have suicidal thoughts. We have many ways to access information on depression and how to treat it – so never delay and reach out. Has someone you know withdrawn from social events? Do they appear tired and disinterested in everything? Do you notice any changes in their appearance? Always remember that different people may express depressive symptoms in different ways – you are always welcome to speak with us, collect information from our clinic or give us a call.

A psychologist is a mental health specialist with undergraduate and postgraduate training in psychological treatment. Psychologists range from those who suffer serious mental illness to those needing support in understanding their relationships, thoughts, feelings and behaviours.

A psychiatrist is a medical doctor with additional specialised training in mental health. They are able to prescribe medication and work well with GP’s and psychologists.

Stress is a normal sense of tension and worry that occurs during times in life with extra pressure. Anxiety is much more intense state of fear that effects the physiology of our body and of our thoughts. Anxiety can feel all-encompassing and interfere with everyday life. Not everyone experiences anxiety in the same way therefore it is important you gain a clear understanding of what you are feeling and why. Symptoms of anxiety can include; rapid heart rate, hot flushes, shaking hands, difficulty concentrating, poor short term memory, shortness of breath, difficulty articulating your thoughts or mind going ‘blank’, sweating and dizziness. People have often described anxiety as if:

  • “I needed to escape the situation”
  • “I thought everyone was staring at me”
  • “I wanted to run out of the room”
  • “I thought I was having a heart attack”
  • “I felt as those something was seriously wrong with me”
  • “I couldn’t describe what was happening to me”
  • “I felt sick and wanted to go home”

Have you ever been to a GP and thought you might be suited to another doctor? It is the same with a psychologist. It is important that in the first session you ask questions and learn about the therapist’s style in order feel comfortable. We make it easier by speaking with you before your first appointment, this way you can ask the psychologist what type of approaches they take to treatment and have a clearer idea of what to expect. We have more than one psychologist so we can easily refer you on to the right therapist for you. You or someone you know may have had a disappointing experience with a psychologist or counsellor in the past – do not let this be a barrier to reaching your goals. We care about placing you with the right person, with the right intervention and at the right time.

ABSOLUTELY NOT. Psychological therapy is for a wide range of individuals, and those who attend private practice are often high functioning individuals who wish to better their lives and learn more about themselves. Think about this:
– One in four Australians reported moderate to severe levels of distress this year. The highest levels of stress and distress were reported by young Australians (18-25 and 26-35 year age group). Older Australians, aged 66 and above, continued to report significantly lower levels of stress and distress – Australian Psychological Society
– One in five Australians will experience a mental illness or serious mood disorder during their lives. Every one of us is affected by the cost: emotionally, socially and financially – Mental Health Victoria
– Depression and anxiety are the most prevalent mental disorders experienced by Australians. Depression alone is predicted to be one of the world’s largest health problems by 2020 – Mental Health Australia
Am I Normal? written on a blackboard

Burnout is term commonly used to describe those who experience feelings such as; exhaustion, emotional distress, limited motivation and overall fatigue and worry associated with one’s job. It can lead to interpersonal difficulties, mood disturbance and overall health problems. It is important we recognise our limits and need for a balanced lifestyle. If you are unsure if this applies to you, or want to learn how you developed these feelings, discuss your concerns with a psychologist. Do you feel upset when thinking about your job? Do you find it difficult to concentrate during job tasks? Are you experiencing nightmares about your job? Do you experience feelings of nausea or headaches before getting to work? Do you struggle to keep up with all the jobs you have to do?

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